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Booyeembara

Lyon, in his article in the Perth Gazette, 20 April 1833 p. 64, suggests that Booyeembara and other such names are based on geological observation:

The following distinctions in the description of the country, will show that these savages are not destitute of geological knowledge. ...
Booyeembara, the division along the coast, consisting principally of limestone rock ; and generally bearing the xanthorea, and a few of that species of the Eucalyptus, called white gum. ...
These divisions have no reference whatever to the territorial boundaries of the different tribes. They seem to be purely geological. [See the bottom of this page for the longer quotation.]

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Rose Pinter, nee Wise, was a key member of the Fremantle Council in setting up the Park.

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Lyon, in his article in the Perth Gazette, 20 April 1833 p. 64, suggests that Booyeembara and other such names are based on geological observation:

The following distinctions in the description of the country, will show that these savages are not destitute of geological knowledge. It is highly probable that in their poetical compositions would be found allusions to the origin of the different divisions of the country here enumerated, and all lying to the Westward of the Blue mountains ; for a doubt can now be hardly entertained that the whole of Quartania is of recent formation.

Booyeembara, the division along the coast, consisting principally of limestone rock ; and generally bearing the xanthorea, and a few of that species of the Eucalyptus, called white gum. See booyee

Gandoo, the division behind Booyeembara, and running parallel. This is a sandy division, and abounds with that species of the Eucalyptus, called Mahogany

Warget, the division behind Gandoo, and parallel ; streching along the foot of the mountains, like the other divisions from South to North. This division abounds with clay, red loam, and alluvial plains ; and, generally bears those species of the Eucalyptus, called the blue and flooded gums.

These divisions have no reference whatever to the territorial boundaries of the different tribes. They seem to be purely geological.

References and Links

Boo Park

Website of Friends of Booyeembara Park

Notes in Fremantle, the newsletter of the Fremantle Society: October 1993 from the time before the Park was laid out.


Garry Gillard | New: 4 July, 2017 | Now: 31 May, 2018