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Booyeembara Park Master Plan 1999

[This is a—not completely corrected—text-only version of Ecoscape's masterplan - for quick reference. The full PDF, with images, is available online.]

City of Fremantle
Booyeembara Park Landscape Master Plan
Prepared for City of Fremantle
April 1999
Prepared by Ecoscape (Australia) Pty Ltd
In association with Mary Warinner Landscape Architecture
Space Consultants Urban Thresholds Natural Power Systems
2505-0568-98

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.................................................................... ii
1. INTRODUCTION.................................................................. 1
2. MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT............................................................2
2.1. Narratives................................................................. 3
2.1.1. Geomorphological Narrative............................................... 3
2.1.2. Recycling Narrative........................................................3
2.1.3. Community Narrative.....................................................4
2.2. Reconciliation................................................................ 5
23. INTEGRATED FACILITIES PLAN...................................................7
2.3.1. Integrated Facilities.................................................. 7
2.3.1.1. Cafe................................................................. 7
2.3.1.2. Meeting Rooms..........................................................7
2.3.1.3. Toilets........................................................8
2.3.1.4. Budget............................................................... 8
3. SUMMARY OF KEY ISSUES RAISED IN STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION............................9
3.1. APACE.....................................................................9
3.2. Golf...........................................................................9
3.3. Sustaining Settlements..................................................... 9
3.4. Waste Management......................................................... 9
4. APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY........................................................ 10
4.1. Objective.....................................................................IQ
4.2. Suggested Inclusion of Energy & Environmental Fbatures into Existing Narratives.10
4.3. Solar Area Lighting...........................................................11
4.4. CafE and Amenities Buildinos....................................................11
4.5. Grid -connected Sour Electricity................................................12
4.6. Waste Disposal and Recycling- Composting Toilets and Grey Water Recycling.....12
4.6.1. Suitability for Urban Public Parks..................................... 13
4.6.1. Grey water recycling............................................ 14
4.7. USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY FOR WATER PUMPING................................. 15
4.8. Planning requirements of renewable energy and appropriate technology features.16
5. ART PROJECTS......................................................................17
5.1. Public Art in Booyeembara Park................................................... 17
5.2. Specific Art Projects for Booyeembara Park: a List of Opportunities......... 18
5.3. Other Funding for Art Projects............................................ 21
6. STAGING........................................................................ 22
REFERENCES....................................................................... 23
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 Electricity and Water Requirements...........................................15
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure l Narratives....................................................................2
Figure 2 Narrative Expressed......................................................... 2
Figure 3 Booyeembara Park Master Pun...................................................6
Figure 4 Integrated Facilities................................................... 8
Figure 5 Composting toilet........................................................ 12
Figure 6 Staging .....................................................................22

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Design Team acknowledges the support and input provided by the Booyeembara Park Implementation Advisory Committee, composed of the following people:

• Councillor Ian Thompson
• Councillor Rose Pinter
• Councillor Geoff Graham
• Tony Baird, Environmental Projects Officer
• Terry Farrell, Community Representative
• Daniel Sowelu, Community Representative ® Jela Ivankovic, Community Representative
• Aiden Davidson, Community Representative
• Roy Lewisson, Community Representative

Introduction

Booyeembara Park Landscape Master Plan

1. INTRODUCTION

Booyeembara Park has been subject to a number of studies that culminated in a concept plan being prepared in December 1997 for the development of a contemporary park on the site, Ecoscape et al. (1997). The concept plan was adopted by Council in 1998 following an extensive public consultation process. Money was allocated for the partial implementation of the park during the 1998/99 financial year, which included the preparation of a master plan and detailed design of the park.

This report outlines the design process undertaken in the masterplanning phase, the results of the design process, the staging of the project over the next five years and the implementation costs.

The masterplanning phase enabled the development of the detail of the vision provided in the concept planning phase as well as staging scenarios and cost estimates. Three additional elements were included in the master plan brief, these included:

• an integrated facilities plan - the development of a shared facility for park users, golfers who use the public golf course, teaching rooms etc form the brief for this facility

• reconciliation - as part of the reconciliation process undertaken by Council wanted to ensure that the reconciliation process was incorporated into the park as part of the master planning phase.

• appropriate technology - consideration was to be given to the incorporation of appropriate technology into the park where possible, this included power, waste water disposal, recycling etc. The aim was to be able to demonstrate the use of these technologies within the frame work of the park.

The master plan design team consisted of the following people David Kaesehagen - Ecoscape (Australia) Pty Ltd Mary Warinner - Mary Warinner Landscape Architecture Ross Donaldson - Ross Donaldson SPACE Consultants Andra Kins - Urban Thresholds Steve Dear - Natural Power Systems

2. MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT

The design process involved weekly designs sessions with team members and fortnightly meetings with Council’s Booyeembara Park Implementation Advisory Committee. A collaborative approach was undertaken as part of the design process, which facilitated a cooperative and creative spirit with all participants contributing to the design process.

The park’s design is unique and sets new standards for the design of public parks. The design is based on Fremantle’s landform, environment and culture which are collectively represented at this site.

Three narratives form the basis of the design. These are:

• geomorphological axis
• recycling axis
• community axis

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While these narratives formed the basis of the concept plan they were developed in more detail during the master plan stage. The following describes the narratives and provides an explanation of the changes that took place during the master planning phase.

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2.1. Narratives

2.1.1. Geomorphological Narrative

Prominent limestone terraces in the middle of the park form the culmination of land-sea axis. The terraces and dune-like landforms reveal the natural cycles of sedimentation and erosion, of the process of making and remaking of this coastal landscape. These are processes traversing thousands of millions of years, a time which sees the evolution from the earliest organisms to the emergence of the human species.

A sense of timelessness in the land and of natural cycles... a sense of one's place in the land.

The geomorphological axis is the most ancient (measured in millions of years) of the narratives is represented on the site diagonal, the south/west-north/east axis. This contains the narrative on the geomorphology of the land and the formation of limestone. It is represented by the sea, marine shells, aeolian dunes and water (rain). The interaction between these elements gives rise to the formation of limestone.

From the intersection of Montreal and Stevens Streets this axis contains a shell sculpture, a parallel series of wind shaped dunes and a lake. The axis is terminated by the limestone hill and a billabong at its base, the later of which has been formed from a freshwater seep at the base of the hill. The rock and its weathering create the base for plant and animal life. These features are represented by the re-establishment of endemic plant communities on the hill and billabong surrounds. This axis also has some cultural influences. Part of the hills face has been fashioned (by a sculptor) to show the activities of quarrying of limestone, adding further visual diversity to the billabong surrounds. Secondly a slit in the ground midway along the axis represents modification of a cut in the landscape revealing flowing water.

The dunes not only enable the creation of space in a dynamic way but also the additional soil provides a good substrate for growing large trees.

2.1.2. Recycling Narrative

The story of the making of the city occupies the axis between the city and the terraces. The terraces are reminiscent of the quarry formed in the mining of the site for its limestone. The quarry was filled with the rubble of the city’s demolition as it evolved from a small hamlet into a dynamic port. Some of these materials were again recycled in the most recent part of that process. This is the story of the making and remaking of the city over the two centuries of European settlement and the people of that story.

A sense of history, social origins and local identity ... a sense of one's place in history.

The recycling axis is the east-west axis of the one recycling. It expresses the relationship between the city (Western end of the axis) and quarried limestone hill. This narrative expresses the relationship between the quarrying of limestone and the building of Fremantle. It also reflects on the use of the site for landfill into which many building which were built from quarried stone were returned to the quarry upon demolition as waste. Interestingly, this waste material was collected by other tip users for building homes or extensions during the 1980s. Limestone, timber, window frames, masonry materials were readily recycled in peoples homes. This narrative is expressed by the design as an entry gateway and terraces, a facilities building and children’s playground.

2.1.3. Community Narrative

The eastern area of the park is devoted to the story of the local community.

A pathway begins at the top of the terraces, a vantage point providing views to much of the locality. A pathway meanders down to a patchwork of domestic scale garden spaces which tell of the changing ways people of White Gum Valley have made their private gardens. This is a patchwork of the individually quilted tones of evolving personal spaces typical of the back and front gardens which together make up the landscape of the local community. These spaces evolve from the traditional enclosed cottage gardens of the past through to the sustainable gardens of the future with emphasis on indigenous species and permaculture. These gardens speak of the history of families, community attitudes towards gardens and sustainability from generation to generation.

A sense of personal space and time, life cycles ... a sense of one’s place in a community.

The community axis is the expression of the transformation of the domestic garden over time. Three terrace gardens represent the past, present and future of the domestic garden and its relationship to nature and the community.

The lower terrace is the traditional garden of the past. The garden is personal, inwardly focussed, and has exotic plant species introduced by the many cultures that built it. The indigenous landscape remains outside the distinct boundary wall. The individual or the family is the focus of the activities, so a grove of Hills hoists is provided which one can swing on. In the most private, contemplative corner is a garden room with a “pull-chain toilet” sculpture seat.

The middle terrace garden represents the domestic garden of the present. The local community is beginning to appreciate the indigenous landscape and include it in the domestic garden. A traditional pergola supporting a native vine sits half inside and half outside the boundary wall, curvilinear seat walls define the opposite boundary, and focus out to the indigenous woodland, and a grove of grass-trees outside the garden is transformed into a regular grid with-in the garden to represent the people in the space. Composting toilets replace the traditional toilet of the past and a gigantic set of swings offers individual as well as group activities.

The upper garden embodies the community’s hopes for the future of the domestic garden in which the indigenous landscape is fully embraced. The “original” landscape is invited into the garden as well as the garden reaching out into the landscape. Plants that exist here in nature are now cultivated in the garden for food, medicine, and essential oils. Native fruit trees replace exotic ones and the fire pit replaces the BBQ. Communal activities are enjoyed on the human size chess board made of groundcover and artificial turf.

Ramps facilitate the movement between the three terraces. The ramps are all the same length but the change in level decreases as you move up. This is a metaphor for the journey though the transformed gardens - if you choose to take the journey, it becomes easier as you reach the top.

2.2. Reconciliation

As part of the reconciliation process team members attended workshops on reconciliation and provided this information back to back to both the team and the steering committee. Furthermore liaison was undertaken directly by the City of Fremantle with respect to this.

This new park offers one very important opportunity. The opportunity to support and embrace the reconciliation process that the City of Fremantle has recently embarked upon.

The Fremantle City Council is committed to:

• respecting the Nyungar people as the first people of this area;

• supporting Nyungar and other indigenous and non-indigenous people to work together for reconciliation for the benefit of the whole Fremantle community;

• acknowledging the losses suffered by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people since non indigenous settlement;

• developing a Reconciliation Plan for the City of Fremantle, which raises awareness, recommends appropriate reparation and adopts actions and projects, which support reconciliation; and

• inviting the participation and agreement of Nyungar people and other relevant parties in the development of the Reconciliation Policy.

The design team have been aware of the Aboriginal heritage of the Fremantle area and believe that the master plan for the new park offers a suitable site for incorporation of ephemeral and permanent actions to support the ongoing processes of reconciliation and park development. The enactment of rituals, commemoration through memorialisation, naming, planting, training programs and performances can all be accommodated. In the future an Aboriginal person should be invited to join the management committee for the park.

2.3. Integrated Facilities Plan

2.3.1. Integrated Facilities

As one of the most significant areas of public open space in Fremantle, the planning of the park has focussed its intent upon the integration of a broad range of recreational activities for local residents and visitors.

The majority of the area of the site is given to golfing activities: the Royal Fremantle Golf Club (RFGC), the Fremantle Public Golf Course and the practice Driving Range. The other current occupant is Sustaining Settlements, Whilst the RFGC is a self-contained facility, it is important that any new facilities planned as part of the park do not duplicate anything existing, but provides for complementary and common uses for all.

To this end, meetings were held with stakeholders having an interest in the development of integrated facilities. These stakeholders included representatives of the Fremantle Public Golf Course, the Driving Range, Sustaining Settlements and APACE. A summary of the key issues raised is attached. The proposed strategy represents a reconciliation of all the expressions of needs by each of these stakeholders.

The new facilities will thus be accessible to all Park users and golfers. Their siting close to the existing public golf course and golf driving range creates the opportunity for equal ease of access for everyone to the proposed cafe, playground, toilets and meeting rooms.

The design for the buildings will be expressive of the history of the materials and styles of Fremantle buildings. For example, the prominent stone wall featured from the approach on Montreal Street will be comprised of a variety of coursing patterns.

The Park design allows for the ultimate development of the following facilities:

2.3.1.1 Café

The proposed cafe will significantly improve the recreational amenity of the Park and will also provide some revenue generation. The associated enclosed playground overlooking the Park will make the facility very attractive for parents with young children. Located adjacent to the Driving range, it will be convenient for golfers using either the Driving Range or the Public Course, avoiding any need for the duplication of facilities for patrons.

The cafe sits on the City - Land Axis, a space which will provide protected sunny outdoor seating in winter, with the deciduous creepers over the pergolas surrounding the cafe giving summer shade.

The planning provides for a building catering for up to 80 patrons with the potential for additional seating outside.

2.3.1.2. Meeting Rooms The desire for meeting rooms emerged not only from interest from APACE and Sustaining Settlements for running workshops and training classes, but also an expectation of interest from other community groups. The use of this facility should be particularly attractive given the location with the cafe, facilitating formal and informal catering arrangements for meetings.

The current planning provides for a 100m2 room divisible into two separately functioning spaces.

2.3,1.3. Toilets

Provision has been made for six female toilets and four male toilets and a urinal. These facilities will be available for all park users.

The ESD design principles to be applied to these buildings will also give them qualities demonstrating appropriate technologies for sustainable development. These include:

• solar and wind energy generation with an opportunity to feed back into the power grid

• grey water recycling

• orientation to maximise winter solar gain

• protection of outdoor spaces from unpleasant winter and summer winds.

2.3.I.4. Budget

The budget allocation for the provision of these facilities is $400,000.

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Copyright © Ecoscape (Australia) Pty Ltd, 2000 2505-0568-98

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3. SUMMARY OF KEY ISSUES RAISED IN STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION

3.1. Apace

• interest in potential occupancy of part of the site (say 2ha) given Apace’s imminent lease review

• potential involvement in a variety of activities including: community gardens; training; composting; seed orchards

3.2. Golf

• potential to shift fourth fairway south by 100m to create buffer with Sustaining Settlements on

High Street

• potential to shift driving range 50m south

• interest in shared facilities including: a kiosk; toilets; change rooms

• opportunity for parkland landscaping on the first 50m of golf land from the southern boundary

• revegetation of the rough

3.3. Sustaining Settlements

• current problem with golf balls being hit into their facility needs to be addressed

• would like to build an education resource centre

• have plans to expand beyond current community gardens activities

• would like to run programs “on the ground” in the park development as part of their training activities

3.4. Waste Management

• the recycling depot for green household waste requires 2ha of land

• there is a problem of access through the park to current site due to the need for heavy vehicle movement

• there is an interest in mulching similar to Cockburn (windrows)

Note: the Steering Committee subsequently recommended that ail Waste Management

activities be relocated from the site.

Appropriate Technology

4. APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY

4.1. Objective

To propose and document suitable appropriate technology and renewable energy features for the proposed Booyeembara Park development, consistent with the existing concept plan and community consultation process. Additionally to ensure conventional infrastructure work (electricity/water/sewerage) doesn’t preclude, and where possible facilitates, the later inclusion of such features.

4.2. Suggested Inclusion of Energy & Environmental Features Into Existing Narratives

The main transects of the park, namely:

• south-west (geomorphological narrative)

• east-west (recycling narrative)

• north-south (community narrative)

also coincide with major environmental and renewable energy related features. These are:

Wind Energy

(south-west and or east-west axis)

Fremantle experiences a very marked diurnal variation of winds due to the contrasting heating effects of the ocean and land along the west coast. The prevailing/energy-bearing winds arising from this natural process are the easterly land breezes which are common in the morning hours and which often give way to a strong south-westerly sea-breeze. The cooling effect of the afternoon sea-breeze has a strong community influence in moderating daily maximum temperatures in summer months and the breeze has been named the ‘Fremantle Doctor’.

Solar Energy

(east-west and/or north south axis)

The obvious connection with solar energy is the daily passage of the sun from east to west. Also, as we are in the southern hemisphere the sun travels through the northern half of the sky and this is the principal direction for aligning solar technology such as solar panels and solar water heaters. The proper use of northerly aspects is also a major design element of solar passive architecture which makes additional use of the suns passage north in winter to provide summer shading and winter warmth.

As the features discussed above cover more than one transect the hill top site may be a logical place to draw together these parts of the narratives. There is also the potential that such narratives could be reflected in artwork. Perhaps a somewhat abstract installation with some representation/reflection of the cardinal directions discussed above. The artwork may also have a northerly aspect and seasonal shading effects to tie in the solar architecture theme.

Appropriate Technology

Booyeembara Park Landscape Master Plan

4.3. Solar Area Lighting

While the cost of off-peak electricity for lighting is relatively low there are substantial costs associated with supplying mains power over distance, particularly if the actual energy requirements are modest. Solar based street lighting has been introduced in recent years to meet this need. It is based on standard street lighting poles and luminaire designs and incorporates pole-top solar panels and a low maintenance battery bank. Some examples of solar lighting are to be found at the World of Energy, Fremantle; Ozone Park, Perth; and in Broome. Typically, the lights have an incorporated timer circuit, which will save energy by limiting the operating hours after sunset. Further, motion sensors can be included to activate the light only when a pedestrian passes.

• Indicative costs are $2500 for a 6 hour light and $500 for installation

• Design considerations include the trade-off between park lighting for safety, convenience and visual impact and the need to preserve night-time dark in natural bush areas. The lower illumination typically associated with solar lighting and judicious choice of the lighting period and/or motion sensor controls may be used to help meet these considerations. Solar lighting may also find application in speciality lighting effects for art installations, for example optic fibre based effects.

Suggested areas for application, being remote from the planned supply of mains power, are:

• South-western park entry and path to the water body

• Southern entry area opposite Sullivan Hall

Lighting in the vicinity of the proposed cafe buildings may best be met with mains powered lighting.

4.4. Cafe and Amenities Buildings Passive Solar

The cafe and associated building, while reflecting in their design the community and recycling narratives of the park, also provide opportunity for effective use of solar passive design features; Solar pergolas or deciduous shade on the north, south and east faces can allow veranda dining and park viewing with appropriate shading in summer and sunlight in winter. The eastern side also provides summer afternoon shade and shelter from strong sea breezes. The use of glass on the southern and eastern walls would contribute to natural lighting within the building and provide excellent views over the park area. However consideration should be given to the use of solar film or other solutions on easterly windows to limit the heating and glare effects of morning sun. An important design consideration will be the use of natural ventilation such as the cool south-westerly sea breeze and night breezes to moderate temperatures within the building in summer.

Appropriate Technology

Energy Efficiency

The operation of the cafe also provides an excellent opportunity for adopting state of the art energy efficiency features in a commercial environment. These include:

• efficient artificial lighting where natural lighting is insufficient

• sensor based security lighting

• efficient refrigeration

• waste heat extraction

• fuel efficient heating source e.g. gas

4.5. Grid-connected Solar Electricity

The higher electricity tariff associated with on-peak electricity use (17.5 c/kWh) make the cafe and amenities buildings an excellent opportunity to demonstrate the use of grid connected solar energy. This recently emerging technology makes the use of photovoltaics more cost-effective by eliminating the need for expensive battery storage. The solar panels are connected by an inverter directly to the grid. Solar energy generated on site is used to meet local loads and shortfall or excess is instantly accommodated by the utility grid supply. An example of such a system is the recently installed grid-connected wind and solar energy system at Apace, being the first community-based installation of the technology in the state.

• Indicative costs are of the order of $8500 for a 360 watt installation (installed and connected)

• Design considerations include solar access for the panels - solar access should be clear for solar elevations of 40 degrees or greater and within V 60E of north.

• The cafe area may also be suitable for a small-scale wind turbine; perhaps mounted on a nearby pole to avoid spoiling the building lines. An example of a suitable small scale turbine is given in the picture below. Mounting options for the solar panels included a tilting array, flush mounting on the roof, or roof integrated designs where the solar panels are part of the roof structure.

4.6. Waste Disposal and Recycling - Composting Toilets and Grey Water

Recycling

Figure 5 Composting Toilet

Appropriate Technology

4.6.1. Suitability for Urban Public Parks

There have been a number of successful installations of composting toilets in public parks. A good regional example is Penguin Island where two years of operation and a Visitation rate of 30,000 per year have required only the routine maintenance ordinarily associated with toilet facilities. There have also been recent urban installations of composting units in the Thomlie area.

Several manufacturers and design concepts exist. These include:

• Clivus Multrum (composting)

• Dowmus (worm-based composting)

• Rota-loo (several composting chambers, filled on a rotational basis to allow lengthy composting periods)

A common structural requirement is the need for under floor access of 1 to 2m to accommodate the composting chambers. Composting toilets could be used effectively at the southern feature area opposite Sullivan Hall and within the proposed cafe facility. Proposed units have been sited within the master plan to allow the appropriate under-floor access.

Regulatory requirements

As the cafe will be a food preparation area existing health regulations will need to be observed. For example, separate toilet facilities will be required for kitchen staff.

Indicative Costs

Note: Costs are indicated for composting systems both with and without specifically designed kit buildings for composting enclosures. The cost of usual toilet fittings and services (hand basins, water, power, lights etc.) are not covered in the below.

Men’s Facilities - Cafe

• 40,000 use/year composting enclosure

• 2 by Pedestal (Disabled available)

• 1 by Urinal

Indicative Cost (sub-total of above / with kit bldg) $9000 / $ 17000

Booyeembara Park Landscape Master Plan

Appropriate Technology

Women’s Facilities - Cafe

• 40,000 use/year composting enclosure

• by Pedestal (Disabled available)

Indicative Cost (sub-total of above / with kit bldg) $9000 / $ 18000

Staff Facility - Cafd

• 20,000 use/year composting enclosure

• 2 by Pedestal

Indicative Cost (sub-total of above / with kit bldg) $5100/$13100

South-east entrance (near Sullivan Halil Male & Female

• 40,000 use/year

• Pedestal/1 Urinal

• 24 hour solar powered ventilation

Indicative Cost (sub-total of above / with kit bldg) $9400 / $20000

4.6.1. Grey water recycling

The cafe and amenities buildings also offer the opportunity to employ grey water recycling schemes to make the most effective use of water consumption on site. Several composting toilet suppliers offer plans and regulatory advice on grey water schemes to complement their products. In addition some composting systems also allow the recycling of food and green waste on site. However such recycling would have to be consistent with the cafe’s role as a commercial food preparation and dining area and meet the appropriate regulatory requirements.

4.7. Use of renewable energy for water pumping

Table 1 Electricity and Water Requirements Overall water requirements

Area under reticulation 9 ha ,1.

Water requirement 40 mm/wk

Required volume 3600 cubic m

Pump rate 25 l/s

Head 80 m

Requires two 12 l/s pumps with each pump rated at 15 kW

Seasonal pumping hours

Period usage

Jan-Feb 40hrs/wk

Winter 20 hrs/month

Year 20 hrs/wk

Ave. electricity consumption 7.14 kW 0.83 kW ' 3.57 kW '

86 kWh per day

The above table, based on information provided by Hydroplan, demonstrates the substantial electricity and water requirements of the park. The use of water can be minimised by limiting irrigated areas, maximising the use of native species and adopting grey water recycling where appropriate. The electricity requirement for water pumping is equivalent to that of around 5 homes. However this usually occurs in off-peak hours, and in such cases parks are often supplied by the Time of Use (R1) tariff as below:

• Supply Charge $ 1.00 per day

• On-Peak Energy Charge 17.50 c/kWh 8 am to 10 pm Mon-Fri

• Off-Peak Energy Charge 5.4 c/kWh At all other times

At the off-peak rate of 5.4 c/kWh both solar and small-scale wind generated electricity are far from competitive, having indicative costs of around 20 to 40 c/kWh. In contrast, the proposed cafe and associated facilities are likely to consume power during on-peak times which will attract a premium rate of 17.5 c/kWh. Thus, these facilities offers the best opportunity for show casing solar generation technologies (see the accompanying discussion of grid-connected solar). While the Time of Use tariff does place limitations on the commercial role of renewable energy technologies in the park the larger-scale environmental advantages of using off-peak power should be stressed. These advantages include the reduction of peak electricity consumption on the state electricity grid which postpones the need for new fossil-fuel powered power stations.

4.8. Planning requirements of renewable energy and appropriate technology

features.

The proposed renewable energy and appropriate technology features have been selected to

allow their simple integration into the phased development of the park. Some planning

requirements to be met during the earth-works and planting of stage 1 are as follows:

Provision of 240 volt services:

• Utility power services to be provided to the cafe and bore pumps. This may best be done by installing a stand-alone meter box and power board on the Montreal Street verge at a suitable location between the cafe and bore pump sites, thus minimizing the cable runs. Sufficient space should be left in this switchboard for a sub-meter and associated fusing and switching for the proposed cafe facility.

• The use of stand-alone solar area lighting along the south-western path and south-eastern feature area will limit the need to lay down mains cabling prior to earth-works and planting.

• The proposed grid-connected solar panels on the cafe building will not require changes to be made to the normal provision of electrical services in this building.

Sewerage or septic connections:

• The use of composting toilets throughout the park removes the need for planning sewer or septic tank access prior to earthworks and planning.

• It will be necessary to ensure approximately 1.5 m under-floor access is retained for the composting toilets as provided in the master plan.

Additional services for composting toilets:

• Water (hand basins and cleaning) and lighting services will still be required for the composting toilets. If natural lighting (skylights etc.) does not suffice then mains lighting (cafe area) or solar lighting (Sullivan Hall area) should be provided.

Art Projects

5. ART PROJECTS

5.1. Public Art In Booyeembara Park

What is public art?

Public art is art located in public spaces and buildings other than galleries and museums. It is created by artists for outdoor spaces such as parks, foreshores, beaches, city squares, .streets, courtyards, and forecourts, or indoor spaces in public buildings such as schools, hospitals, churches, shopping centres, recreation centres, local government administration centres, office buildings, hotels, law courts and detention centres.

Public art can be permanent, lasting many years, or temporary, lasting a few days or months. It can be site-specific, drawing its meaning from and adding to the meaning of a particular site or place, or non site- specific, located in an public place primarily for display purposes.

Public art can take many forms in many different materials. It can be free standing sculpture or integrated into the fabric of buildings or outdoor spaces. As well as creating sculptures and painted murals, artists may work individually or with other designers and manufacturers to create mosaic and ceramic floor or wall insets, stained glass windows, ornamental metal gates or grates, Water fountains, light fittings or door handles, street furniture, topiary figures and planting patterns, neon figures, or multi-media installations.

Why have Public Art at Booyeembara Park?

Public art can improve the QUALITY OF LIFE of the Fremantle community.

Through incorporating public art projects in the development of Booyeembara Park the City of Fremantle has an opportunity to support many of the community values considered important by the local community namely:

• tolerance

• respecting the Nyungar people as the first people of this area

• compassion

• inclusiveness - cultural diversity •creativity

«environmental sustainability

• natural and cultural heritage

• openness to learning

• holism

More specifically through initiating and implementing Public Art Projects at Booyeembara Park the City of Fremantle may:

• focus on the expression of local identity - celebrating local cultural heritage, and cultural diversity, and thus enhancing the potential for cultural tourism •

• enhance the quality of the community environment - providing a useable, well designed and aesthetically pleasing public open space for residents and visitors

• enhance community spirit - creating new opportunities for community expression

• enable community members to experience contemporary art as part of their daily life - heightening the profile of visual arts and raising the awareness of the value of visual arts and design in Fremantle

• provide employment opportunities for local artists and craftspeople

• set a positive example for other agencies and private developers - encouraging other agencies and private developers to adopt similar initiatives

The City of Fremantle has a Public Art Strategy in place and it is recommended that the projects proposed for Booyeembara Park be incorporated into this Council document.

With respect to specific projects the City of Fremantle is urged to support and implement:

• the incorporation of artworks in projects at the earliest possible stage of overall project planning

• new design partnerships between artists, architects, urban planners and other professionals involved in developing and planning community facilities

Development and management of public art projects

Public art can be achieved through differing organisational processes depending on the aims of the project:

1. acquisitions (linked to Art Collection Policy)

2. commissions

3. community arts projects

Public art practice may involve arts professionals such as artists, art consultants and cultural planners, depending on the project brief developed for each individual public art projeqt. An artist may be asked to work as a member of a design team to contribute their conceptual skills and arts experience to the overall design of an area, or they may be asked to develop their own artwork proposals for the area. An arts consultant or cultural planner may work with designers to identify a range of art opportunities within a project.

It is recommended that the City of Fremantle address the issue of specific operational procedures relating to public art projects through the development of a Procedures Manual based on best practice as implemented by the Department of Contract & Management Services for the state government Percent for Art Scheme.

It is recommended that the City of Fremantle engage an Art Consultant to develop and manage public art projects for Booyeembara Park.

5.2. Specific Art Projects for Booyeembara Park: a List of Opportunities

STAGE 1

Project no 1: 'Shell spiral*

Focus on paving inserts and seating / low walls in the ‘shell’ area Themes

• ocean, water, ocean life, shells

• a spiralling down through time

• evolutionary processes and in particular the sedimentary processes involved in the formation of limestone

Project type: Community arts project

Professional artist working with members of the community and liaising with design team Artworks budget:

artist’s fees & implementation: $41,000

Art consultant’s fees (project development & management) $4,000 (in Stage 1 consultants’ fees budget)

Project no 2: ‘A walk alone time’

Evolutionary / geomorphological time axis pathway project focussing on pathway and ‘sliced’ ends of dune structures and terminating at the jetty extending into the water body.

Theme: An artistic interpretation of the time line from the beginnings of the universe to today, incorporating the bridging of life between land and water.

Project type: Artist commission Professional artist liaising with design team

Artworks budget:

artist’s fees & implementation: $41,000

Art consultant’s fees (project development & management) $4,000 (in Stage 1 consultants’ fees budget)

Project no 3: Reconciliation Project

Development of an art project expressing reconciliation. Consultation with local Aboriginal people to develop the brief and implementation strategy for a public art project in the park. Also identifying other opportunities for Aboriginal involvement in'the park (Signage, bush tucker, planting etc)

Art consultant to be engaged or project to be undertaken by Community Arts Officer at the City of Fremantle. Art Consultant’s fees for project development - liaison with City of Fremantle: $2,500.

STAGE 2

Project no 1: Playground

Artist involvement in a design team to design and implement playground.

Artist fees for design stage: $5,000

(Further artist involvement will depend on the design that is developed.)

Project no 2: Signage

Artist / graphic designer involvement in signage design and implementation.

Artist / graphic design fees for design stage: $8,000. (Further artist / graphic design involvement will depend on the design that is developed.)

Copyright © Ecoscape (Australia) Pty Ltd, 2000

Project no 3: ‘Recycling’

Generational axis pathway project focussing on recycling narrative

Theme: Recycling from quarry to building, building to landfill to building. Recycling as a process that links the site to the City of Fremantle.

Project type: Artist commission Professional artist liaising with design team

Artworks budget:

artist’s fees & implementation: $60,000

Art consultant’s fees (project development & management) $6,000

STAGE 3

Project no 1: ‘Back yard stories*

Focus on the landscaped area that is based on expressing the archetypal back yard and its history associated with family social life and trends in planting (fruit trees, Vege patches etc.)

Themes:

• back yard stories (focus on neighbouring Hilton)

* transition from traditional planting to more natural landscaping

Project type: Community arts project

Professional artist / s (visual artist and writer) working with members of the community and liaising with design team

Artworks budget:

artist’s fees & implementation: $41,000

Art consultant’s fees (project development & management) $4,000

Project no 2: ‘Hanging out the washing*

Focus on the landscaped area that is based on expressing the archetypal back yard and its history associated with family social life and trends in planting (fruit trees, vegetable patches etc.)

A set of sculptures (6 to 8) referring to ‘hills hoists’ - back yard stories - hanging out the washing(focus on neighbouring Hilton). (Could also possibly function as shade structures)

Project type: Artist commission Professional sculptor liaising with design team.

Artworks budget:

artist’s fees & implementation: $45,000

Art consultant’s fees (project development & management) $4,000

STAGE 4

Project no 1: ‘Quarry'

Artist involvement in a design team to design and implement ‘quarry cut’ to cliff face.

Artist fees for design stage: $4,000 j

(Further artist involvement will depend on the design that is developed.)

Project no 2: ‘Looking out’

Artist involvement in a design team to design and implement creation of a lookout.

Artist fees for design stage: $4,000

(Further artist involvement will depend on the design that is developed.)

Further projects:

• Sculptures artworks, some perhaps ephemeral, located in natural bushland for people to come across during walks.

• ecological art projects associated with the water body

5.3. Other Funding for Art Projects

It is recommended that the City of Fremantle, through tie Cultural Services Coordinator, seek funding from appropriate grams bodies for the public art projects proposed. Some appropriate funding sources are:

1. Australia Council

• Community Cultural Development Fund: CEAD grants program.

Next closing date: 15 September 1999.

• Visual Arts / Craft Fund: Commissions program.:

Next closing date: 15 August 1999.

2. ArtsWA

• Investment category: New concepts. This category offers support to organisations wishing to commission in the area c)f visual arts.

Next closing date: 16 July 1999. j

3. Community Arts Network WA Inc j

• Catalyst Funding for Community Arts in WA.

Next closing date: 10 September 1999.

6. STAGING

The construction of Booyeembara Park has been divided into four stages. The project staging reflects both community and Council desire to ensure that the vision for the park is developed in an orderly manner, is accessible and useable by the public and has a high level of detail incorporated into each stage. The four stages are:

• Stage 1: The first stage involves the construction of the south western comer of the site including the dunes, car park, pathways, lake, jetty, lawned areas, spiral shell sculpture and tree and shrub planting.

• Stage 2. In the second stage the recycling narrative along the northern boundary is the primary focus for construction effort. This includes the construction of the integrated facilities building (café, kiosk, teaching rooms etc), playground, alley of olive trees, park entrance.

• Stage 3. The third stage of the project involves the construction of the community narrative axis on the south-eastern comer of the site. Terraced gardens reflecting the change in garden design from the colonial period to more contemporary styles form much of the construction work.

• Stage 4. The remaining central and eastern sections of the park form the fourth stage of the construction phase. This includes the lake at the toe of the hill, sculptural terraces on the face of the hill, grassed areas, bushland and parkland elements as well as a terraced amphitheatre on the grassed hillside flank.

REFERENCES

Ecoscape, Mary Warinner Landscape Architecture, Space Consultants and Urban Thresholds (1997).

Montreal Street Public Open Space Project Report. Unpublished Report, City of Fremantle.


Garry Gillard | New: 5 August, 2019 | Now: 26 October, 2020