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Fremantle Studies Day 2016

The Fremantle History Society invites you to join us on Sunday 30th October between 1 and 5pm at the WA Army Museum, Burt Street Fremantle for four new papers which consider special places and themes in Fremantle's history, leaving us with important questions to ponder.

Enjoy stimulating papers, good company and our legendary afternoon tea.
Registrations open at 1pm for a 1-30pm start
Price: $20 members, $25 non members
Bookings: secretary.fhs@gmail.com
WWW: www.fhs.org.au : fremantlehistorysociety.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/flyer.pdf
FACEBOOK:/fremantlehistorysociety

Papers

'Revealing the City of Fremantle Art Collection', André Lipscombe.
André Lipscombe is the Curator of the City of Fremantle Art Collection. His illustrated talk will shed light on artworks making connections with Fremantle and its people.

'From card catalogue to eBooks: a history of Fremantle City Library, 1851-2016', Pam Harris.
History Librarian Pam Harris is currently Treasurer of the Fremantle History Society and manages the Fremantle History Centre.

'Fremantle’s Link to the Crimean War', Diane Oldman.
Diane Oldman, formerly a Training and Development Officer, currently generates websites profiling Crimean War Veterans and the 20th Company of the Royal Sappers and Miners.

'Is increasing density a threat to Fremantle’s heritage?' Winthrop Professor Carmen Lawrence.
Former State and Federal politician Carmen Lawrence, now Winthrop Professor, is the Director of the Centre for Social Change at UWA and Chair of the Australian Heritage Council.

Images:1. A Falling Sickness c.Ken Wadrop,1978; 2. John Birch, FCL 5131; 3. Illustration, Jonathan Bentley, Courier Mail, 11/3/2016; 4. Siege of Sebastopol, Special Collections, University of Southampton

André Lipscombe: Revealing the City of Fremantle Art Collection.

The City of Fremantle Art Collection is a significant cultural asset often described as a ‘frame’ or ‘window’ upon a range of perspectives about place, the record of events there and of its people. The Collection holds over 1400 historical and contemporary artworks, many produced by artists who reside and work in the City. They record the history, ambience, activities and rituals of place that are so important and popular with Western Australians.

André Lipscombe is a visual artist based in Perth who has twenty-five years working in the Arts sector in urban community and regional settings and has been a Curator for the City of Fremantle Art Collection for 13 years. He has produced many exhibitions for the Fremantle Arts Centre, most recently 40 Years of the Fremantle Print Award and a major retrospective exhibition of the work of Official War Artist Frank Norton.

Pam Harris
From card catalogue to eBooks: a history of Fremantle City Library 1851-2016

In 1949 Fremantle City Library was one of the first free lending libraries in the State. Prior to this time the Fremantle Literary Institute provided this service to those who could afford to pay. Now the library provides the services required for a 21st century library. This paper considers the history of the library in the context of the history of Fremantle, the people who worked there and how the service has evolved in response to changes in society’s needs and the way information is provided by the development of the Internet at the end of last century.

Pam Harris has a degree in Social Sciences (with Distinction) majoring in Australian History and Politics and a Graduate Diploma in Information and Library Studies. Pam has worked in libraries for over twenty-four years, most recently as a librarian with the Heritage Council and the Supreme Court Law Library. For the last nine years Pam has been History Librarian at the Fremantle City Library.

Diane Oldman
Fremantle’s link to the Crimean War

Fremantle was landfall for around 350 veterans of the Crimean War. They came as the enrolled pensioner force (Chelsea Pensioners); warders and gaolers of the Convict Establishment; policemen who formed the WA Force; military pensioners retiring their rifles for artisans’ tools and farming implements; and court martialled convicts grabbing their second chance. The Crimean War veterans left Fremantle a legacy of street names, buildings and interesting people.

Diane Oldman was born, educated and started her working life in England. She lived in the United States and Canada, settling in WA forty-five years ago. Formerly a Training & Development Officer, in retirement she is generating websites profiling Crimean War Veterans and the 20th Company of Royal Sappers and Miners who came to work with the Convict Establishment.

Winthrop Professor Carmen Lawrence
Is increasing density a threat to Fremantle’s heritage?

Cities like Fremantle are important cultural landscapes, but as their populations expand, redevelopment and increasing density may threaten many sites of great cultural, aesthetic, and historic significance. Development is not inevitably destructive, but poor city planning and the indifference by elected officials to important sites and streetscapes can combine to create a host of problems threatening sites of human cultural heritage as well as human wellbeing.

After training as a research psychologist at the University of Western Australia and lecturing in a number of Australian universities, Dr Lawrence entered politics in 1986, serving at both State and Federal levels. For 21 years, she was W.A Minister for Education and Aboriginal affairs and then the first woman Premier and Treasurer of a State government. Shifting to Federal politics in 1994, Carmen was elected as the Member for Fremantle, becoming Minister for Health and Human Services and Minister assisting the Prime Minister on the Status of Women. She then held various portfolios in Opposition, including Indigenous Affairs, Environment, Industry and Innovation, and was elected national President of the Labor Party in 2004. Retiring from politics in 2007, she re-entered academia and is now Director of the Centre for the Study of Social Change in the School of Psychology at the University of Western Australia and Chair of the Australian Heritage Council.


Garry Gillard | New: 20 January, 2018 | Now: 4 August, 2019