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Fremantle Stuff > bridges > Ferries

Ferries

Before the various road bridges were constructed, it was necessary to go by ferry to cross the Swan River from Fremantle, either from Richmond (later East Fremantle) to North Fremantle or at Preston Point.

October 2nd of that year [1867] saw the opening of the North Fremantle traffic bridge. That was built by convict labour, the stone for the approaches being quarried by the chain gang. Previously both passengers and vehicles were conveyed across the river by ferry boats worked by convicts. Hitchcock: 52

Special cross-harbour ferries were in use to take lumpers to work on the North Wharf, as seen below in this c. 1930 photo by George Davidson. John Dowson writes that two of the Harbour-Trust-owned ferries were Victor II and Ivanhoe. That's the tug Wyola in the right background.

ferries

Thanks to the FHC for this c. 1930s photo #2379.

These vessels conveyed the lumpers (waterside workers) to the various landings along North Wharf (Quay). The Ivanhoe and Victor II were Harbour Trust owned; the remainder privately chartered. The tug Wyola is visible on the right. In the background is the original slipway which was abandoned during WWII.

References and Links

Dowson, John 2003, Old Fremantle: Photographs 1850-1950, UWAP.

Hitchcock, J.K. 1929, The History of Fremantle, The Front Gate of Australia, 1829-1929, Fremantle City Council.

Tuckfield, Trevor 1971, 'Early colonial inns and taverns', Early Days: Journal and proceeedings of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society, 7, 3: 65-82; Part 2, Early Days: Journal and proceeedings of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society, 7, 7: 98-106.


Garry Gillard | New: 29 September, 2017 | Now: 30 September, 2017